Monday, March 6, 2017

Upgrading One Simple Tool in Your Home Can Be Life Changing


This tool gets a lot of use in your house on a daily basis

Often times this tool is too small, not deep enough, made with the wrong materials, or old and outdated. This tool gets used multiple times every single day, most likely by multiple people in the family. Even though it gets used so much more often than your table saw or power drill, most won’t think to spend the small amount required to make drastic difference with the right upgrade.



The tool we’re highlighting is the kitchen sink. The activity center and hub of the kitchen. Upgrading from one sink space to two or three can make all the difference in the world. Increase your sink’s depth if you’re tired of having to dry your clothes off from splash back every time you clean a dish. Sick of working tirelessly to clean enamel? Stainless steel could be your answer.

There are certain “experts” saying that no one washes dishes anymore, and thus double bowl sinks are irrelevant in this day and age. I don’t know where these so called experts are getting their facts, but with multi-family homes on the rise in America and so many other factors at play, it seems as though doing dishes is still a very real task that occurs. Double sinks can help with the feeling that your kitchen is overrun with dishes.

The reasons for going with an enamel sink are obvious. They look great. The downside: they get stains easy and will wear out over time. Solid surface sinks are a breeze when it comes to cleaning, but chipping is a very real issue. If both of these concerns present a real problem for you, consider going with the durable, relatively easy to clean option of stainless steel. If you do decide stainless, it will most likely be a good idea to get an under mount to prevent a food trap under the lip and protect against leaking.

The faucet is just as important as the sink itself. A nice, new faucet can make all of the difference in your kitchen. With all of the different options out there, the general consensus is to just buy quality; looks come second. Don’t just suck it up and deal with it if your faucet breaks or starts acting up. Yes, a faucet can cost just as much as a new sink, but in the long run it will be money well spent.

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